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YouTube Restricted My Talk on Policing

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YouTube Restricted My Talk on Policing

New York Post August 4, 2020
Urban PolicyCrime
OtherCulture & Society

If your 12-year-old son goes on YouTube, he can watch a porn star giving a lap dance to a happily surprised young man. He can see nubile, naked girls spooning with a naked male and frolicking in Las Vegas hotel pools. Your 14-year-old daughter can watch videos on how and why to transition to the male gender.

Both your son and daughter can learn how to become an “antifa warrior.” Under the tutelage of an anarcho-communist YouTube host, they can celebrate the fiery destruction of a Minneapolis police precinct during the recent anti-police rioting in that city, a conflagration the ­anarcho-communist deems the “high point” of the rioting to date. They can get tips on how to suit up for further anti-police action — with helmets, water bottles and, of course, personal protective equipment.

Yet your children can’t watch a livestreamed speech on policing I gave Thursday, arguing that US law enforcement isn’t engaged in systemic violence against blacks. YouTube has deemed the speech inappropriate for children under 18 and blocked access to minors.

I suppose I should be grateful — at least it’s on the Web at all. YouTube had initially wiped the speech off its servers entirely on the ground that it violated the site’s “community guidelines” for keeping YouTube a “safe place.” No further explanation was given.

YouTube’s community guidelines ban content that “encourages others to go to a particular place to commit violence” or that incites “violent acts against individuals.” Far from encouraging ­violence, I had condemned the ­rioting and had warned that the ideological war against the police was leading to a tragic loss of black life, as cops backed off from proactive enforcement in high-crime communities.

Continue reading the entire piece here at the New York Post

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Heather Mac Donald is the Thomas W. Smith fellow at the Manhattan Institute, contributing editor at City Journal, and the author of the bestselling War on Cops and The Diversity Delusion. Follow her on Twitter here.

Photo by v777999/iStock

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