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When Governments’ Barriers to Housing Step over the Line

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When Governments’ Barriers to Housing Step over the Line

Governing May 20, 2021
Urban PolicyHousing

A new state board in New Hampshire offers a speedy, non-judicial way to challenge onerous local land-use decisions. It’s a way to prevent a hot housing market from overheating.

Last month, The Wall Street Journal and Realtor.com ranked the top emerging housing markets — places with both a high quality of life and high expected house-price appreciation. The study crowned Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, with top honors. But New Hampshire stands out as the only state with two markets in the top 10, with Concord and Manchester-Nashua taking the eighth and ninth spots.

New Hampshire is indeed a great place to live. In addition to its low taxes, low crime and great natural beauty, the state has the country’s fifth-lowest unemployment rate and its lowest poverty rate.

Continue reading the entire piece here at Governing

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Brian Chen is a J.D. candidate at the Yale Law School, where he studies land use, state and local government, federalism, and public finance. Based on a new report.

Photo by photovs/iStock

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