Your current web browser is outdated. For best viewing experience, please consider upgrading to the latest version.

Contact

Send a question or comment using the form below. This message may be routed through support staff.

Email Article

ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed
ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed
search DONATE
Close Nav

The Supreme Court’s Chance to Fight State Discrimination against Faith-Based Schools

back to top
commentary

The Supreme Court’s Chance to Fight State Discrimination against Faith-Based Schools

National Review Online December 8, 2021
EducationPre K-12
OtherCulture & Society

To discriminate against schools on the basis of their religious activity is to discriminate against them because of their religious identity.

Today, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in Carson v. Makin, a case that concerns whether Maine may constitutionally exclude religious schools from participating in the state’s private-school tuition-assistance program. To those who have been paying attention to recent Supreme Court decisions in this area, the answer may seem obvious: Such discrimination is unconstitutional. The Supreme Court said as much last year when it held that Montana could not exclude religious schools from participating in its own school-choice program and, before that, in 2017 when it struck down a law that offered aid only to secular nonprofit organizations in Missouri.

Continue reading the entire piece here at National Review Online (paywall)

______________________

Kathleen Porter-Magee is the superintendent of Partnership Schools, a network of nine urban Catholic schools, seven in Harlem and the South Bronx and two in Cleveland.

Photo by tiero/iStock

Saved!
Close