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The State Pension Crisis Goes Beyond the Big Blue States

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The State Pension Crisis Goes Beyond the Big Blue States

The Wall Street Journal May 30, 2020
Public SectorPension Reform
Urban PolicyTax & Budget

Politicians and fund administrators everywhere wasted the reform potential of an 11-year bull market.

Legislators from Illinois and New Jersey provoked an outcry in April when they asked Washington to bail out their failing pension systems. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell offered instead to let states file for bankruptcy. His message: Don’t expect aid for problems that have little to do with fighting the novel coronavirus and the economic slowdown accompanying it.

The crisis in state pension systems is a result of decades of fiscal mismanagement. The problem, however, goes well beyond deeply indebted Illinois and New Jersey. Many state and municipal retirement funds have been on an unrelenting downward trajectory for 20 years, failing to gain ground even during the 11-year bull market that followed the 2007-09 recession. Now, with the economy in tatters because of the coronavirus, more government pension systems are close to a crisis, and taxpayers are running out of time to demand a solution.

The figures are startling. At the end of the 1990s, most pension systems were fully funded, with no debt. But the steep market declines of 2000 and 2001 drove funding levels down to 89% by 2003, and debt soared to $233 billion, according to Pew Research. Though pension administrators assured taxpayers the funds would rebound, the plunge in financial markets in 2008 sent systems reeling again. By 2010 state funds were on average only 75% funded, and unfunded liabilities had tripled to $750 billion. Years of subsequent market gains haven’t reversed the trend. By 2018 state pension debt had reached $1.2 trillion, and the latest market downturn has almost certainly sent it soaring again.

Continue reading the entire piece here at The Wall Street Journal (paywall)

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Steven Malanga is the George M. Yeager Fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a senior editor at City Journal.

Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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