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The de Blasio Revolution That Wasn’t

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The de Blasio Revolution That Wasn’t

New York Daily News September 12, 2019
Urban PolicyNYC

Mayor de Blasio swept into office six years ago with sweeping promises to end the “Tale of Two Cities.” Despite $20 billion in new spending, however, surprisingly little has changed in New York City.

De Blasio’s revolution never arrived, unless one counts universal pre-K and ferry subsidies as a revolution.

In a new report from the Manhattan Institute, I review the mayor’s mixed record on a number of promises and key policy initiatives. Income inequality was never within the mayor’s direct control, admittedly. But city services are.

Amidst gradually falling crime citywide and some promising public safety pilots like the Mayor’s Action Plan for Neighborhood Safety, public housing residents continue to suffer the city’s highest violent crime rates.

Universal pre-K has proven popular, but English and math proficiency rates remain staggeringly low in traditional public schools, especially among poor and minority students.

Continue reading the entire piece here at the New York Daily News

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Alex Armlovich is a fellow at the Manhattan Institute. This piece is based on a new issue brief, Poverty and Progress in New York XIII: The de Blasio Years. Follow him on Twitter here.

Photo: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

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