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Subsidiarity and Family Policy

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Subsidiarity and Family Policy

National Affairs June 21, 2022
OtherChildren & Family

In the last decade, portions of the political right in America have warmed to the idea of a muscular central government. These strands of statism — known variously as nationalism, populism, integralism, industrial planning, common-good capitalism, and common-good constitutionalism — are connected by their adherents' belief that, were the correct people given a great deal more power to tame elites, markets, Big Tech, liberalism, culture, etc., conservatism could finally rack up some "wins."

The movement is motivated by the view that recent-vintage American conservatism has focused too much on process and not enough on substance. That is, the right's traditional reliance on individual freedom, capitalism, originalism, civil society, and positive law didn't solve — and may have in fact exacerbated — our most serious problems.

Continue reading the entire piece here at National Affairs

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Andy Smarick is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute. Follow him on Twitter here.

Photo by LENblR/iStock

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