Your current web browser is outdated. For best viewing experience, please consider upgrading to the latest version.

Contact

Send a question or comment using the form below. This message may be routed through support staff.

Email Article

ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed
ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed
search DONATE
Close Nav

It Is a Tree of Life

back to top
commentary

It Is a Tree of Life

Commentary November 15, 2021
OtherMiscellaneous

Review of 'Squirrel Hill' by Mark Oppenheimer

One of the most striking features of Pittsburgh’s Squirrel Hill neighborhood is the seamlessness of its Jewishness. On two blocks of the main drag, one finds a Starbucks, a handful of Chinese restaurants, a library, and a smattering of local businesses—standard fare. But there is also a mikveh, a Jewish day school, two synagogues, and a fully kosher Dunkin’ Donuts (one of just 13 outside of the New York City area). There are Jews in black hats, Jews in kippahs, Zionist Jews, Bend the Arc Jews, and at least one self-identified Jewish “priestess.” The institutions of ancient, religious Judaism stand side by side with the trappings of the modern, liberal Jew.

“In other American cities with a sizable Jewish population, the Orthodox would likely have their own enclave, the secular Jews would be scattered around town, and most of the Jews, certainly the non-Orthodox ones, would have gone to one suburb or another,” the journalist Mark Oppenheimer writes. “Such a Jewish community exists nowhere else in the United States.”

Continue reading the entire piece here at Commentary

______________________

Charles Fain Lehman is a fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a contributing editor of City Journal.

Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

Saved!
Close