Your current web browser is outdated. For best viewing experience, please consider upgrading to the latest version.

Contact

Send a question or comment using the form below. This message may be routed through support staff.

Email Article

ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed
ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed
search DONATE
Close Nav

Restaurants Can Solve Their Staffing Crisis, but Higher Pay Alone Isn’t the Answer

back to top
commentary

Restaurants Can Solve Their Staffing Crisis, but Higher Pay Alone Isn’t the Answer

The Dallas Morning News June 23, 2021
EconomicsEmployment
Civil SocietyOther

Restaurant owners must create environments where employees can learn new skills and grow.

As the pandemic recedes and the country comes back to life, Americans are lining up to return to restaurants. The only problem is that workers aren’t. The restaurant industry and other hospitality and service industries, which were among the hardest hit by COVID-19 and the resultant lockdowns, are facing a critical labor shortage.

While politicians in Washington blame each other for misguided policy decisions, others see a restaurant industry that has long been broken. The trials of 2020 merely lifted the veil on the sector’s structural problems: low wages, poor benefits, prevalent sexual harassment, unpredictable hours, and unfriendly workplaces, now combined with new health risks associated with COVID-19.

This piece originally appeared at The Dallas Morning News

_____________________

Brandon Chostrowski is a civil society fellow at the Manhattan Institute.

Photo by ablokhin/iStock

Saved!
Close