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The Grand Swindle of ‘Progress’ in the City’s Public Schools

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The Grand Swindle of ‘Progress’ in the City’s Public Schools

New York Post July 2, 2019
Urban PolicyNYC

If Jamie Dimon ran his banks as fraudulently as Richard Carranza runs New York City’s schools, the feds would be on him like pigeons on a pretzel. But all Carranza gets is the occasional wet kiss from City Hall. Where’s the justice?

Carranza’s not into go-to-jail fraud, of course. That’s reserved for folks who bamboozle bank customers, and it’s no felony to swipe a kid’s future. Which, basically, is what Carranza and his $40 billion bureaucracy get away with every day.

Here’s how it works.

  • The Department of Education lacquers up a school with an absurdly aspirational name to gull kids and their parents into thinking they might have a chance someday.
  • Then the educrats pretend to teach important stuff, but actually they don’t teach much of anything at all.
  • Along the way the books get cooked: Hard performance benchmarks are softened to the point where they lose all meaning; progress is measured without regard for the world outside DOE; class standing reveals little about knowledge accumulation — and the credentials issued at the end of the process have no objective value.

Thus do so many of the students leave the assembly line functionally illiterate, innumerate and unprepared to function in post-industrial New York.

Take, for example, the Science School for Exploration and Discovery, aka Bronx Middle School 224, which is doing very, very well indeed — according to the school itself. The Post’s Susan Edelman reported over the weekend that 94% of MS 224’s sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders passed their math classes in the 2017-18 school year. Pretty good, huh?

Continue reading the entire piece here at the New York Post

______________________

Bob McManus is a contributing editor of City Journal. He retired as editorial page editor of the New York Post in 2013 and has since worked as a freelance editor, columnist, and writer.

Photo by fernandogarciaesteban/iStock

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