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As Private Sector Bleeds, NYC Government Has Barely Even Begun Belt Tightening

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As Private Sector Bleeds, NYC Government Has Barely Even Begun Belt Tightening

New York Post July 6, 2020
Urban PolicyNYCTax & Budget

Crisis, what crisis? You don’t have to look at the numbers behind the city’s new, $92 billion budget to see that neither the mayor nor the City Council takes the COVID-19 calamity seriously: Just to look at the number of workers the city plans to keep on board over the next year.

By next June, Gotham expects to be able to pay 329,152 people, ranging from 131,358 teachers to 1,317 mayoral-office staffers. You might imagine this figure represents a sharp cut to the 2019 levels, the last fiscal year before the pandemic hit (that is, the fiscal year that ended last June).

You would be wrong. Last summer, the city had 332,315 workers. The projected loss of 3,163 jobs is less than 1 percent of the number of workers.

No one wishes a job loss on anyone, particularly when there are few jobs to be had. But something just doesn’t add up here. As of late June, 1.4 million New Yorkers in the private and nonprofit economies had lost their jobs, a staggering one-third of the pre-COVID-19 workforce of nearly 4.1 million people employed in February.

Somehow, Mayor Bill de Blasio and the City Council expect a decimated private economy to pay to hold the public-employee workforce entirely harmless, when you remember the fact that people ­retire every year, anyway.

And how will the city achieve even these modest cuts? It will cut 1,106 police officers, mainly by cancelling one recruit class.

Other than that, Hizzoner and the council haven’t sent any signal at all that any department could stand some cuts.

Continue reading the entire piece here at the New York Post

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Nicole Gelinas is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and contributing editor at City Journal. Follow her on Twitter here.

Photo by TomasSereda/iStock

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