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Politicians Must Stand Up to NYC’s Anti-Cop Movement, or We’re in Trouble

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Politicians Must Stand Up to NYC’s Anti-Cop Movement, or We’re in Trouble

New York Post November 6, 2019
Urban PolicyNYCCrime

Around 1,000 protesters marched through downtown Brooklyn Friday alleging police brutality in the subways. They chanted familiar slogans — “No justice, no peace/F – – k these racist police,” and called for violence. Choruses of “punch a cop in the face/every nation, every race,” were echoed by large banners reading, “Ante Up! Punch that cop!” Cop cars were tagged “NYPD KKK,” and eggs and garbage were thrown at a police cruiser.

The “#FTP” (f - - k the police) action was inspired by two recent incidents where police made arrests on subway platforms. In one, an early-morning melee spilled underground, and cops were filmed using force to break up the fighting and subdue people resisting arrest; one teen shoved a cop and was punched in the face; he’s suing the city for $5 million.

In another, police swarmed Adrian Napier, whom they believed was carrying a gun; they found no weapon but arrested him for jumping the turnstile. The incident, captured on video, received national attention.

“Officers should be working to de-escalate,” former HUD Secretary Julian Castro commented, “not putting dozens of lives at risk over $2.75.” But Napier was apprehended after fleeing the police and escaping into the subway; his arrest was not precipitated by jumping a turnstile.

These incidents took place in the context of a campaign against fare evasion, which has accelerated dramatically following the announcement that local prosecutors would no longer pursue “theft of service” charges against arrestees. Arrests for turnstile-jumping are down about 40 percent since last year. The NYPD now largely writes tickets for the violation, reserving arrest for serial evaders.

Continue reading the entire piece here at the New York Post

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Seth Barron is associate editor of City Journal and director of the NYC Initiative at the Manhattan Institute. This piece was adapted from City Journal.

Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

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