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Murder Is Rising — but New York Doesn’t Seem to Care

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Murder Is Rising — but New York Doesn’t Seem to Care

New York Post June 16, 2020
Urban PolicyCrimeNYC

There’s something going on out there on the streets. No, not that — we all know that New York’s political class is encouraging tens of thousands to protest endlessly in a pandemic. Something else: The same pols are ­ignoring the biggest pre-summer spike in murder Gotham has seen in 30 years.

For decades now, people traumatized by the death toll exacted in New York’s killing years — 2,262 people killed in 1990 — have warned of impending ­reversion. Starting many Januaries, the smallest increase in homicide is seen as a return to the “bad old days.”

So far, these warnings have proved false. Give Mayor Bill de Blasio credit: He has always ­understood that an increase in the murder rate would equal his own political failure.

In 2017, New York City saw a low of 292 murders, and no sustained alarming increases since.

Until 2020, Hizzoner managed a high-wire act made possible by sheer good luck.

Record tax revenues meant he could add 1,700 cops to the beat, ending mechanistic stop-question- and-frisk practices conducted over the previous decade by a smaller force. Technology, too, meant real-time ­visual images of suspects.

And, as former NYPD Commissioner Bill Bratton said, the Big Apple could enjoy a “peace dividend.” A prevented murder is multiple prevented murders, as it means no one feels the need to avenge the initial slay.

Continue reading the entire piece here at the New York Post

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Nicole Gelinas is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and contributing editor at City Journal. Follow her on Twitter here.

Photo by kali9/iStock

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