Your current web browser is outdated. For best viewing experience, please consider upgrading to the latest version.

Contact

Send a question or comment using the form below. This message may be routed through support staff.

Email Article

RSVP

Forum

Mitt Romney’s Child Allowance and the New Social Conservatism: A Conversation between Scott Winship and Samuel Hammond

Scott Winship Director of Poverty Studies, American Enterprise Institute
Samuel Hammond Director of Poverty and Welfare Policy, Niskanen Center
Reihan Salam President, Manhattan Institute
Fri, Feb 26, 2021 EVENTCAST

Thank you for your RSVP.

ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed
ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed
search DONATE
Close Nav

Mitt Romney’s Child Allowance and the New Social Conservatism: A Conversation between Scott Winship and Samuel Hammond

back to top
SEE ALL EVENTS
Forum

Mitt Romney’s Child Allowance and the New Social Conservatism: A Conversation between Scott Winship and Samuel Hammond

Scott Winship Director of Poverty Studies, American Enterprise Institute
Samuel Hammond Director of Poverty and Welfare Policy, Niskanen Center
Reihan Salam President, Manhattan Institute EVENTCAST 01:00pm—02:00pm
Friday February 26
Friday February 26 2021
PAST EVENT Friday February 26 2021

In the first week of February, Mitt Romney introduced the Family Security Act, which would send every married couple earning less than $400,000, and every single-parent earning less than $200,000, $350 a month for every child they are raising under the age of 5, and $250 a month for every child between 5 and 17. The bill has set off a heated debate on the American right about the best way to honor family values in the 21st century.

Scott Winship and Samuel Hammond are two of the most influential voices in this intra-right debate. Winship, the Director of Poverty Studies at the American Enterprise Institute, argues Romney’s child allowance would help children at the expense of marriage, work, and the long-term good of the children themselves. Hammond, Director of Poverty and Welfare Policy at the Niskanen Center, argues that America’s twin challenges of declining working-class marriage and declining fertility ought to be understood as harmful byproducts of our free market system, which demand an active response from the government. It is a debate at once technical and philosophical.

Please join us on February 26 for a debate between Winship and Hammond moderated by MI president Reihan Salam. We will cover the merits of the Family Security Act, the long legacy of the 1990s welfare reform debates, and the political economy of social conservatism.

TOPICS
OtherChildren & Family
Saved!
Close