Your current web browser is outdated. For best viewing experience, please consider upgrading to the latest version.

Contact

Send a question or comment using the form below. This message may be routed through support staff.

Email Article

ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed
ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed
search DONATE
Close Nav

If Schools Don’t Intend to Teach This Fall, They Should Give Someone Else a Chance

back to top
commentary

If Schools Don’t Intend to Teach This Fall, They Should Give Someone Else a Chance

RealClearPolicy June 12, 2020
EducationPre K-12

Around the globe, school is back in session. Across Europe, kids returned to class in Belgium on May 18, Finland on May 14, France on May 11, Norway on April 27, Germany on April 20, and Denmark on April 15. But in the United States, parents in many communities are being told that their schools might not even re-open by September.

What’s going on? After all, the fatality rate in the U.S. lies below most western European nations. Some of our teachers are nervous, but so are theirs. Some of our parents are reluctant to send their children back to school, but so are theirs. What’s different?

While our counterparts across the Atlantic are rolling up their sleeves and making it work, American education elites are busy playing a game of chicken with state and federal lawmakers.

Continue reading the entire piece here at RealClearPolicy

______________________

Max Eden is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute. Follow him on Twitter here

Frederick M. Hess is director of educational policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute.

Photo by Morsa Images/iStock

Saved!
Close