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Terror and the Teddy Bear Society

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Terror and the Teddy Bear Society

The Wall Street Journal June 6, 2017
OtherNational Security & Terrorism

Even the arrests after each attack give comfort to the enemy, which can act with impunity even if known.

The only man I ever met whose ambition was to be a suicide bomber was an inmate at the British prison where I worked as a doctor in the 1990s and 2000s. He was a career criminal of very nasty propensities whose father was Arab and mother English. He had reached his 30s, the age at which criminals usually turn away from crime in favor of something better—in his case the killing of as many infidels as possible, along with himself.

Coming to religion is one reason, or pretext, for abandoning crime. In the prison there was much more Islamic evangelism than Christian. I would find Qurans and Islamic pamphlets in drawers, insinuated there by I knew not whom, but never Bibles or Christian pamphlets.

I interpreted religion as the means prisoners used to rationalize giving up common crime while at the same time not feeling defeated by, or having surrendered to, the society around them—for they knew conversion to Islam gave that society the shudders.

The problem for the security services, however, is that there is no invariable profile, social or psychological, of the Muslim terrorist. Nor is there a kind of economic lever that can be pulled so that....

Read the entire piece here at The Wall Street Journal

_____________________

Theodore Dalrymple is a fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a contributing editor to City Journal.

Photo by Carl Court / Getty
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