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Student Discipline and Disorder

Wed, Apr 26, 2017 New York City

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Manhattan Institute

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Student Discipline and Disorder

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Student Discipline and Disorder

New York City 08:30am—10:30am
Wednesday April 26
Wednesday April 26 2017
PAST EVENT Wednesday April 26 2017

A revolution in student discipline is sweeping across America, as school districts—encouraged by the Obama administration's Department of Justice and Department of Education—increasingly cut back on issuing suspensions.

This policy shift is driven by concern that alleged racial bias among teachers and administrators is responsible for disproportionately high rates of suspensions among black and Hispanic students. Under mayor Bill de Blasio, New York has joined the swelling ranks of U.S. cities that have made it harder to sanction unruly students.

Critics of such "discipline reform" point to a growing body of data and anecdotes that suggest that reducing the threat of suspension is making schools less orderly and safe. In his new report, "School Discipline Reform and Disorder: Evidence from New York City Public Schools, 2012-16," MI senior fellow Max Eden finds that the learning environment in New York schools is deteriorating fast—and that the biggest victims are black and Hispanic students.

8:30 - 9:00 AM Registration
9:00 - 9:05 AM

Opening Remarks
Howard Husock, Vice President,
Research & Publications, Manhattan Institute

9:05 - 9:15 AM Presentation— "Student Discipline in NYC"
Max Eden, Senior Fellow, Manhattan Institute
9:15 - 10:00 AM Panel Discussion— "Student Discipline Nationwide"
Max Eden, Manhattan Institute
Lois Herrera, CEO, Office of Safety and Youth Development, NYC Department of Education
Derek Jackson, Director, Law Enforcement Division, Local 237
Katherine Kersten, Senior Policy Fellow,
Center of the American Experiment
Moderator: Howard Husock, Manhattan Institute
10:00 - 10:15 AM Audience Q&A

 

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