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Manhattan Institute

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New Issue Brief Explores Evidence for Lifting New York’s Cap on Charter Schools

press release

New Issue Brief Explores Evidence for Lifting New York’s Cap on Charter Schools

February 20, 2019
Education

State legislature caps NYC charter school growth despite their positive impact on minority communities

NEW YORK, NY – New York City’s high-performing charter schools represent a boon for minority students from impoverished families: over 80% of charter students are low-income, and 91% are African-American or Hispanic. But a state law capping their growth means only seven new charter schools can be created in the city before the limit is met. In a new issue brief, Manhattan Institute director of education policy Ray Domanico provides a snapshot of the evidence on charters, showing how they outperform district schools, without threatening the success of these same schools.

Charter students in New York City significantly outperform state and local peers in academics. For example, the percentage of NYC charter students who scored proficient or better on annual standardized tests exceeded the average of all other district schools in the state by 12.8 percentage points in English language arts (ELA) and by 15.8 percentage points in math. Among minorities, charter school outcomes are even more impressive: African-American charter students outperform statewide district school peers by 34.1 percentage points in math and 26.4 percentage points in ELA.

What’s more, the success of charter schools does not come at the expense of district schools—in fact, there is a reason to believe charters improve the performance of neighboring district schools. Further, as Domanico details, charters:

  1.  Are not starving district schools of funding;
  2. Are not pulling students away from district schools;
  3. Receive less funding per pupil than district schools; and
  4. Don’t succeed by recruiting the best students.

Click here to read the full report.

CONTACT

Nora Kenney
Press Officer, Manhattan Institute
(646) 839-3313
nkenney@manhattan-institute.org
 

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