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Poverty and Progress in New York VIII: Welfare Trends, 2013-15

issue brief

Poverty and Progress in New York VIII: Welfare Trends, 2013-15

February 17, 2016
Urban PolicyWelfareNYC

Abstract

The Manhattan Institute's "Poverty and Progress in New York" series tracks the effects of Mayor de Blasio’s policies on lower-income New Yorkers. This paper, the eighth installment, examines public-assistance trends during 2013–15.

Key Findings

  • With the exception of food stamps, more New Yorkers now depend on some form of public assistance than at the start of the de Blasio mayoralty.
  • The 12-month job-retention rate—which measures the percentage of former welfare recipients who remain employed (and thus avoid returning to public assistance) for at least one year—fell from 75 percent in 2013, Mayor Bloomberg’s final year in office, to 64 percent in 2015.
  • In December 2015, the number of safety-net assistance recipients was up 14 percent compared with December 2013; cash-assistance enrollment was up 7 percent; and food-stamp enrollment was down 9 percent.

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