Your current web browser is outdated. For best viewing experience, please consider upgrading to the latest version.

Donation - Other Level

Please use the quantity box to donate any amount you wish. Sign Up to Donate

Contact

Send a question or comment using the form below. This message may be routed through support staff.

Email Article

Password Reset Request

Register


Add a topic or expert to your feed.

Following

Follow Experts & Topics

Stay on top of our work by selecting topics and experts of interest.

Experts
Topics
Project
On The Ground
ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed
ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed

Manhattan Institute

search
Close Nav
Share this issue_brief on Close

Poverty and Progress in New York: English and Math Proficiency in NYC Schools, 2015–2016

issue brief

Poverty and Progress in New York: English and Math Proficiency in NYC Schools, 2015–2016

July 25, 2017
Urban PolicyNYCEducation

Abstract

The Manhattan Institute’s “Poverty and Progress in New York” series tracks the effects of Mayor de Blasio’s policies on lower-income New Yorkers. This paper examines progress during 2015–16 in English language arts (ELA) and in math on the Common Core–aligned New York State Assessment Program, which covers nearly half a million students in grades 3–8 in the city’s traditional public schools (i.e., non-charter schools).

Key Findings

  • From 2015 to 2016, the percentage of students scoring proficient in ELA rose sharply (7.6 percentage points), while the percentage scoring proficient in math rose slightly (1.2 percentage points).
  • The extent to which these changes reflect real progress is unclear. Major changes were introduced to the 2016 ELA and math exams, including fewer questions; allowing students unlimited time to take the exams; and releasing 75% of test questions from the 2015 exams in advance of the 2016 exams (compared with releasing 50% of 2014 exam questions in advance of the 2015 exams).

READ FULL REPORT

______________________

Alex Armlovich is a fellow at the Manhattan Institute. Follow him on Twitter here.

Saved!
Close