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Manhattan Institute

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Notable & Quotable: Trumping the Elites

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Notable & Quotable: Trumping the Elites

The Wall Street Journal November 10, 2016
OtherCulture & Society

Joel Kotkin in “Trumping the Elites,” published Wednesday in the Manhattan Institute’s City Journal:

Trump swept the areas that keep the lights on and the motors turning.

The map tells all. Clinton won by large margins in the Northeast and on the West Coast, and in states—Colorado, New Mexico, and Nevada—where Trump’s intemperate comments roused Latino voters. But outside of Illinois, a whole swath of the country, from the hills of Appalachia to the fringes of the Rockies, went solidly for Trump.

Trump's America presents an alternative model... and does not see the United States as part of a global system to be managed.

Why would that be? Start with basic economics. The economy in the nation’s interior relies on producing things—an endeavor that the coasts have largely abandoned. Energy, manufacturing, and agriculture still define these economies, and employ many white-collar as well as blue-collar workers. If you live in Texas and Oklahoma, “decarbonization” is a much less attractive concept than it might seem in Manhattan or San Francisco. Trump swept the areas that keep the lights on and the motors turning—Ohio, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Texas, Wyoming, Idaho, Louisiana, and especially West Virginia, where he won by a remarkable 68 to 27 margin.

Among other things, the media missed the fact that the middle of the country and the South continue to gain population. The “blue” model, for the most part, expels people, while, in contrast, the “red” one appeals...

This piece originally appeared in The Wall Street Journal's "Notable & Quotable"

______________________

Joel Kotkin is the presidential fellow in urban futures at Chapman University and executive director of the Center for Opportunity Urbanism. Twitter: @joelkotkin

Photo by Spencer Platt / Getty Images

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