Your current web browser is outdated. For best viewing experience, please consider upgrading to the latest version.

Donation - Other Level

Please use the quantity box to donate any amount you wish. Sign Up to Donate

Contact

Send a question or comment using the form below. This message may be routed through support staff.

Email Article

Password Reset Request

Register


Add a topic or expert to your feed.

Following

Follow Experts & Topics

Stay on top of our work by selecting topics and experts of interest.

Experts
Topics
Project
On The Ground
ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed
ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed

Manhattan Institute

search
Close Nav
Share this commentary on Close

New York City Shouldn't Be Begging for Amazon’s New Jobs

commentary

New York City Shouldn't Be Begging for Amazon’s New Jobs

New York Post November 14, 2018
Urban PolicyNYC

Amazon is a company for the 21st century, but New York is stuck in the past.

The more than $1.5 billion in direct tax breaks and grants the state is offering Amazon to create jobs here — $48,000 a job — would be fine if this were 1978, not 2018. Back then, Gotham’s biggest problem was the loss of hundreds of thousands of good-paying jobs, as companies and people fled a failing city. It’s the opposite today: We have more jobs and people than our subways, parks and schools can handle.

After a yearlong beauty pageant during which Amazon auditioned dozens of cities to locate a second headquarters away from its home base of Seattle, we won! Long Island City, Queens, will be home to half the new headquarters; northern Virginia will be the other half. That means at least 25,000 new jobs for Gotham, which Amazon says will pay an average of more than $150,000 apiece. (Beware of “averages” — if the company is like a bank, a few extremely highly paid individuals will skew the average up.)

For most cities, this would be a big deal. Boston, for example, a generally healthy city with a big tech center, has nearly 1.7 million private jobs; it has gained 200,000 jobs in the past 10 years. Adding another 25,000 jobs over a decade — the amount of time Amazon has to hire folk here — would be a 13 percent boost over that trend. San Francisco has 2.1 million jobs; it has gained 300,000 over the past decade. An additional 25,000 would be 8 percent.

Continue reading the entire piece here at the New York Post

______________________

Nicole Gelinas is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and contributing editor at City Journal. Follow her on Twitter here.

Saved!
Close