Your current web browser is outdated. For best viewing experience, please consider upgrading to the latest version.

Donation - Other Level

Please use the quantity box to donate any amount you wish. Sign Up to Donate

Contact

Send a question or comment using the form below. This message may be routed through support staff.

Email Article

Password Reset Request

Register


Add a topic or expert to your feed.

Following

Follow Experts & Topics

Stay on top of our work by selecting topics and experts of interest.

Experts
Topics
Project
On The Ground
ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed
ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed

Manhattan Institute

search
Close Nav

New York Charter Schools Outperform Traditional Selective Public Schools

report

New York Charter Schools Outperform Traditional Selective Public Schools

March 22, 2017
EducationPre K-12
Urban PolicyEducation

Abstract

More Evidence That Cream-Skimming Is Not Driving Charters' Success

Critics of charter schools in New York City, America’s largest school district, often allege that charters score better on standardized tests, on average, than traditional public schools because charters “cream-skim” (i.e., attract) the brightest, most motivated, students.

Yet this accusation neglects the fact that not all traditional public schools are open admission. Some, such as Stuyvesant High School and the Bronx High School of Science, use entrance exams and other demanding criteria to recruit the best students. New York is also home to 98 traditional selective public middle schools.

If admitting students with better academic credentials were the key to better test scores, New York’s traditional selective public schools (which pursue such practices) would easily outperform its charter schools (whose students are admitted by lottery and are more likely to be poor and nonwhite). But this is not the case.

This report compares aggregate test scores in math and English in New York’s 73 charter middle schools with those of its 98 traditional selective middle schools. (There are no traditional selective elementary schools, and state exams in math and English are not administered after eighth grade, the final year of middle school.) It finds that students at charters score equally well in math as (though worse in English than) students in traditional selective schools. However, when an apples-to-apples comparison is made by comparing students only from similar racial and socioeconomic backgrounds, charters shine more brightly: their students score better in math than, and just as well in English as, those in traditional selective schools.

READ FULL REPORT

______________________

Marcus Winters is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and an associate professor at Boston University. Follow him on Twitter here.

Saved!
Close