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Manhattan Institute

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New Report: Has New York City’s Subway System Improved?

press release

New Report: Has New York City’s Subway System Improved?

December 4, 2018

NEW YORK, NY – In June 2017, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo declared New York City’s transit system—primarily the city’s subways—to be in a “state of emergency.”  The long-term goal was to modernize the MTA’s physical assets while the more immediate goal was to better manage short-term inspection, repair, and replacement schedules for tracks.

In a new issue brief, “Has New York City’s Subway System Improved?: A Data-Based Report Card,” Manhattan Institute Senior Fellow Nicole Gelinas shows that, nearly a year-and-a-half in, the “subway action plan” has yielded modest results but the system is still not performing close to the levels of more than half a decade ago.

Gelinas notes:

  • On-time train performance hit 70.3% in October 2018, the best figure for more than two years, but from 2010 to late 2013, the MTA consistently performed with more than 80% of trains arriving on time each day.
  • In October 2018, the MTA’s “mean distance between failures” improved slightly from late 2016 with failures occurring every 122,000 miles up from every 120,000 miles, yet in early 2011 that number was 170,000.
  • While the number of “major incidents” due to track problems has steadily fallen, the MTA has not reduced the number of incidents due to signal problems. That figure stood at 23 per month in the six months ended in October 2018, up from 22 per month in the six months ended in October 2015.

Click here to read the full report

Contact:
Michele Jacob
Director of Publicity
(646) 839-3387
mjacob@manhattan-institute.org

 

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