Your current web browser is outdated. For best viewing experience, please consider upgrading to the latest version.

Donation - Other Level

Please use the quantity box to donate any amount you wish. Sign Up to Donate

Contact

Send a question or comment using the form below. This message may be routed through support staff.

Email Article

Password Reset Request

Register


Add a topic or expert to your feed.

Following

Follow Experts & Topics

Stay on top of our work by selecting topics and experts of interest.

Experts
Topics
Project
On The Ground
ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed
ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed

Manhattan Institute

search
Close Nav
Share this commentary on Close

MI Responds: NY State of the State on Upstate Revitalization

commentary

MI Responds: NY State of the State on Upstate Revitalization

January 13, 2016
Urban PolicyRegulationInfrastructure & TransportationNYC
EconomicsOther

"MI Responds" features real-time commentary from Manhattan Institute scholars on breaking news and developing issues. Click here to view more.

Governor Cuomo’s desire to revitalize upstate communities, particularly economically, is admirable. His proposals don’t seem consistent in promoting this, however. Assistance to local governments for water infrastructure renewal projects will help, as will investments to maintain or rehabilitate upstate highways. Care should be taken to avoid investing in most roadway expansion, however. The stable to shrinking populations of upstate communities and the national declines in miles driven per person suggest expansion is unwarranted.

Likewise, the state should not replicate the enormous subsidies to individual businesses handed out as part of the Buffalo Billion initiative, such the $750 million spent to benefit Solar City. Also, one of the biggest competitive disadvantages upstate communities face in the economic development race is New York State’s onerous regulatory regime. A $15 minimum wage is particularly harmful upstate, where communities regularly have to compete with more business-friendly locales across America.

Aaron M. Renn is a Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a contributing editor of City Journal.

Saved!
Close