Your current web browser is outdated. For best viewing experience, please consider upgrading to the latest version.

Contact

Send a question or comment using the form below. This message may be routed through support staff.

Email Article

ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed
ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed

Manhattan Institute

search
Close Nav

Manhattan Institute Launches Health Care 2.0 Series by Senior Fellow Avik Roy

press release

Manhattan Institute Launches Health Care 2.0 Series by Senior Fellow Avik Roy

January 20, 2016
Health Policy

Papers will focus on how to reform policies impeding health care innovation

NEW YORK, NY – Internet-driven innovation has improved quality and slashed costs in countless sectors of the U.S. economy, but health care continues to lag behind. A new series of reports by the Manhattan Institute’s Avik Roy argues that health care’s inability to advance along with other industries isn’t due to a lack of technology or intelligent workers; it’s because decades of ill-advised government policies have hampered progress and tipped the odds drastically against innovators and consumers.

The Health Care 2.0 series focuses on the existing policies that are preventing a digital revolution in medicine. The first installment of the series, released today, focuses on market forces in health care and the regulations that are warping them. The subsequent papers will cover:

  • Federal anti-kickback statutes that prohibit entrepreneurs from developing innovative ways for physicians and hospitals to coordinate care
  • Archaic regulations and privacy laws that prevent patients from taking ownership of their medical records, creating needless medical errors
  • How telemedicine can decrease costs and increase patients’ access to care
  • The FDA’s regulation of consumer-health technology, such as Fitbit, that suppresses a potential revolution in primary care

Click here to read the full report.

Contact

Communications Department

Manhattan Institute

212-599-7000

communications@manhattan-institute.org

Saved!
Close