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Cuomo's Natural Gas Blockade

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Cuomo's Natural Gas Blockade

The Wall Street Journal August 24, 2017
Urban PolicyNYC
Energy & EnvironmentRegulations

New York’s Governor is raising energy costs for millions of Americans.

The U.S. shale boom has lowered energy prices and created hundreds of thousands of jobs across the country. But those living in upstate New York and New England have been left in the cold by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, whose shale gas blockade could instigate an energy crisis in the Northeast.

Progressives once hailed natural gas as a “transition fuel” to renewables like solar and wind, but now they are waging a campaign to “keep it in the ground.” New York is ground zero. First, Mr. Cuomo banned hydraulic fracturing (i.e., fracking), and now he’s blocking natural gas pumped in other states from reaching Northeast markets.

The Empire State’s southern tier overlays the rich Marcellus and Utica Shale formations, among the most productive drilling regions in the country. Shale fracking has been an economic boon for Appalachia—and could have lifted upstate New York. Since 2010 natural gas production has surged 520% in West Virginia, 920% in Pennsylvania and 1880% in Ohio. (See chart nearby).

Read the entire piece here at The Wall Street Journal

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Appeared in the August 24, 2017, print edition

Photo by John Moore / Getty
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