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Biology Isn't Destiny

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Biology Isn't Destiny

National Review Online August 10, 2017
OtherCulture & Society

What that controversial Google memo gets wrong about men and women in the workplace

Google shouldn’t have fired James Damore. The company claims to encourage internal dissent and debate, and that is what Damore provided. But the contents of his memo are nothing to celebrate: He said nothing that hasn’t already been said, in tiresome fashion, for decades.

Moreover, the people defending the content of Damore’s memo, rather than his right to write it, ignore an important subtlety: Google has a practical job to do — manage the people who make up its business — and Damore’s memo made that job harder.

On the page, Damore comes across not as iconoclastic, but as naïve. His memo reads like something a diligent and earnest high-school freshman might write. “On average, men and women biologically differ in many ways,” is hardly shocking news. As for the rest, we have heard it all before. Women like to stay home making babies and cuddling kittens, while men like to go to war and drive red sports cars fast.

Read the entire piece here at National Review Online

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Nicole Gelinas is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and contributing editor at City Journal. Follow her on Twitter here.

 

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