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Manhattan Institute

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Is the Better Care Reconciliation Act Better Than Obamacare?

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Is the Better Care Reconciliation Act Better Than Obamacare?

National Review Online July 13, 2017
Health PolicyAffordable Care Act

Health-care policy ultimately comes down to trade-offs. This is particularly true when one party is altogether opposed to reform, the other party has a Senate majority of just two, and many of its members are using their leverage to protect various parochial interests.

The Senate GOP has assembled a fragile, slightly amended compromise, the Better Care Reconciliation Act, which contains a vast array of provisions intended to pull together legislators with very different objectives. It is not clear whether it will have the votes needed to pass. But the essential question facing members is ultimately simple: Is the package proposed better than keeping Obamacare?

In short, the answer seems clearly to be “Yes.”

It repeals the mandate that individuals purchase highly regulated health-care plans, whose average premiums cost eight times more than median health-care costs.

Read the entire piece here at National Review Online

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Chris Pope is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute.

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