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How a ‘Slavery’ Uproar at Juilliard School Threatens the Future of Artistic Expression

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How a ‘Slavery’ Uproar at Juilliard School Threatens the Future of Artistic Expression

New York Post May 24, 2021
RaceOther

A drama workshop at The Juilliard School has resulted in controversy.

Turn on CNN or open The New York Times, and you may encounter someone explaining how exhausting it is to be a black person. The idea that systemic racism is leaving blacks scarred and spent has been embraced across mainstream America, articulated by corporate CEOs and university presidents. 

The latest performative assertion of black oppression is playing out at the Juilliard School in New York City. The controversy has significance beyond the school. 

This year, NYU theater professor Michael McElroy, who is black, taught a three-day “Roots to Rep” drama workshop. The workshop would combine history, research and music to explore the journey of black people in this country, McElroy explained, with a specific emphasis on the way “the Negro spiritual . . . is the foundation of so many musical genres today.” 

Continue reading the entire piece here at the New York Post

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Heather Mac Donald is the Thomas W. Smith fellow at the Manhattan Institute, contributing editor at City Journal, and the author of the bestselling War on Cops and The Diversity Delusion. Follow her on Twitter here. Adapted from City Journal.

Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images

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