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Manhattan Institute

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The Business Roundtable’s Statement Isn’t Revolutionary. It’s a Truism.

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The Business Roundtable’s Statement Isn’t Revolutionary. It’s a Truism.

The Washington Post August 22, 2019
Legal ReformCorporate Governance

The Business Roundtable is one of Washington’s top business lobbies, composed of the chief executives from dozens of the United States’ largest corporations. On Monday, the group released a “statement on the purpose of a corporation,” signed by 181 of its 193 members. Critics and supporters of business alike have characterized the statement as a major shift away from “shareholder” capitalism toward an alternative “stakeholder” model pushed by some progressive academics and policymakers.

It isn’t. The Business Roundtable’s statement unequivocally states that “the free-market system is the best means of generating good jobs, a strong and sustainable economy, innovation, a healthy environment and economic opportunity for all.” To be sure, it proclaims that each of the chief executives signing on shares “a fundamental commitment to all of our stakeholders” — including customers, suppliers, employees and the broader community. But that’s a truism. No business can long survive without meeting such stakeholders’ needs.

What’s significant about the statement is what it does not say. The corporate signatories do not suggest in any way weakening the fiduciary duties of the boards and managers of ordinary for-profit shareholder corporations to manage such companies’ affairs for shareholders’ benefit.

Continue reading the entire piece here at The Washington Post

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James R. Copland is a senior fellow and director of legal policy at the Manhattan Institute. Follow him on Twitter here.

Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images

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