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An Emergent Educational Order

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An Emergent Educational Order

American Compass December 15, 2021
EducationPre K-12

This essay is part of an exchange, with Johns Hopkins professor Ashley Berner, discussing the variety of educational models in place around the nation and around the world, assessing the benefits of each, and considering the potential for American education to move toward greater pluralism.

Dear Ashley,

Thank you for kicking off this conversation. Your three-part framework—libertarian, state control, and pluralism—is a smart way to organize this discussion because it captures the different ways a system of schools can be arranged to accomplish a variety of goals. I’ll adopt those categories and their descriptions in what follows both because I find them compelling and because I want to make the case that America need not choose between them. In fact, I think we can best understand America’s history of K–12 education and its current status by recognizing how we’ve blended aspects of each. Indeed, key moments in the development of U.S. primary and secondary schooling, including the most contentious episodes, occurred when we began emphasizing—sometimes overemphasizing—one of the three categories over the other two.

Continue reading the entire piece here at American Compass

______________________

Andy Smarick is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute. Follow him on Twitter here.

Photo by jfairone/iStock

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