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After Waukesha Parade Attack, Progressives Need to Admit Their Bail Reforms Don’t Work

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After Waukesha Parade Attack, Progressives Need to Admit Their Bail Reforms Don’t Work

New York Post November 27, 2021
Policing & Public SafetyAll
Legal ReformOther

In recent years, law enforcement has been warning radical district attorneys and legislators that their bail “reforms” would get people killed. Progressive Milwaukee District Attorney John Chisholm spearheaded efforts to eliminate or substantially reduce bail since he was elected in 2007. Now he has to explain to the world why he let Darrell Brooks out on $1,000 bail after he allegedly ran over his girlfriend. Free to roam, Brooks then mowed down dozens of people at a Christmas parade in Waukesha, Wis., killing six.

In its traditional form, bail is an amount of money that a criminal defendant must pay to be released from jail pending trial. The amount of bail that judges set is usually determined by the risk of flight by the defendant and the likely danger to the community if the defendant is released. A defendant with no prior criminal record arrested for stealing a car might be released on bail of $100. A defendant with a lengthy criminal record, who previously had failed to appear for court appearances, and is now charged with a rape that was captured on video, might have bail set at $5 million.

When you hear that a defendant is sitting in jail merely because he does not have the cash to make bail, consider the example of the charged rapist above. It’s literally true that he lacks the $5 million in cash for bail, but practically speaking, the judgment of the court is that he should not be released pretrial — hence the high bail amount.

Continue reading the entire piece here at New York Post

Tom Hogan has served as a federal prosecutor, local prosecutor and elected district attorney. Adapted from City Journal.

Photo by Mark Hoffman-Pool/Getty Images

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