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A Time to Serve

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A Time to Serve

The Dispatch September 10, 2021
OtherCulture & Society

There is an enormous difference between discussing a serious problem and solving it. We need more problem solvers.

I was a young legislative assistant to a Republican member of the House of Representatives on September 11, 2001. I was in my cubicle in Rayburn when the World Trade Center towers and the Pentagon were hit. I was among those rushing out when word spread that another plane was headed our way. Though I’ve spent much of the following two decades in various government posts, never have I felt more of a patriotic duty than on that day and the weeks that followed. Our nation had been attacked. Fellow citizens had been murdered. 

What can be lost all these years later is how that day rattled the nation. It felt like we were now in a different world, a different era. Most pressing, though, was that Americans were scared that more and worse attacks were right around the corner. Lives were on the line. I, and I’m sure many others, had a sense that our country’s future was at stake. We had to get to work.

Continue reading the entire piece here at The Dispatch

______________________

Andy Smarick is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute. Follow him on Twitter here.

Photo by LeoPatrizi/iStock

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