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A Modest Step toward Entitlement Reform

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A Modest Step toward Entitlement Reform

The Dispatch May 24, 2021
Health PolicyOther
OtherMiscellaneous

A bipartisan coalition has introduced legislation to keep Social Security and Medicare solvent.

It has been said that Washington has two standard responses to America’s challenges: do nothing, or overreact. We are all witnessing President Biden’s $6 trillion overreaction to the (improving) economy and our (very loosely defined) infrastructure needs. At the same time, Washington is doing nothing about an economic challenge that will ultimately cost many times more than $6 trillion and risk the economic security of tens of millions of Americans: the collapsing finances of the Social Security and Medicare systems.

But not all hope is lost. Sen. Mitt Romney (R-UT), joined by a bipartisan coalition of senators such as Kyrsten Sinema (D-Arizona), Todd Young (R-Indiana), Mark Warner (D-Virginia), John Cornyn (R-Texas), Joe Manchin (D-West Virginia), and Rob Portman (R-Ohio)—as well as a bipartisan coalition in the House—has introduced the TRUST Act (S. 1295), which would set up a bipartisan legislative process to keep the Social Security, Medicare, and highway trust funds solvent.

Continue reading the entire piece here at The Dispatch

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Brian M. Riedl is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute. Follow him on Twitter here.

Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images

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