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Lecture

2019 James Q. Wilson Lecture: The Entrenched vs. The Newcomers

Edward L. Glaeser Harvard University
Wed, Sep 4, 2019 New York, N.Y.

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2019 James Q. Wilson Lecture: The Entrenched vs. The Newcomers

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Lecture

2019 James Q. Wilson Lecture: The Entrenched vs. The Newcomers

Edward L. Glaeser Harvard University New York, N.Y. 06:00pm—07:30pm
Wed Sep 4
Wed Sep 4 2019
PAST EVENT Wed Sep 4 2019

Americans love to think of their cities as incubators of opportunity. While this has often been true, there are increasing signs that successful city-dwellers are making it harder for newcomers to follow their example. In housing and labor markets, insiders appear to be winning in terms of wealth accumulation, advancement, and political advantage. Flawed land-use regulations discourage new construction and inflate costs, while minimum-wage laws insulate existing workforces from competition and hamper the economic and geographic mobility of newcomers, particularly young adults and migrants.

The proliferation of unfair laws and regulations is walling off opportunity in America’s greatest cities. In this year’s James Q. Wilson Lecture, MI Senior Fellow Edward Glaeser will address the conflict between entrenched interests and newcomers in its economic, political, geographic, and generational dimensions. The question for policymakers is whether they enhance the gains that flourish from the proximity and openness that cities offer, or double-down on the advantages secured by exclusion and anti-competitive behavior.

Edward Glaeser is the Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics at Harvard University, where he has taught since 1992, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, and a contributing editor of City Journal. He has also served as director of the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and as director of the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston. His work has focused on the determinants of urban growth and on the role of cities as centers of idea transmission. He holds a B.A. from Princeton University and a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.

Sponsored, with admiration, by a former student of James Q. Wilson.

TOPICS
EconomicsEmployment
A manhattan institute series

Wilson Lectures

For 15 years, James Q. Wilson, who passed away in March 2012, delivered an enormously popular annual lecture for the Manhattan Institute. The impressive variety of his topics—the criminal-justice system, the roots of terrorism, the role of the media in shaping public opinion, and the nature of democracy, to name just a few—reflected his wide-ranging intellect, and the size of the audiences that attended testified to a long and admiring relationship between Professor Wilson and the Manhattan Institute.

Wilson, a former professor at Harvard University and UCLA, wrote many books, among them The Moral Sense and The Marriage Problem. His public service included the chairmanship of the White House Task Force on Crime in 1966 and the National Advisory Commission on Drug Abuse Prevention from 1972 to 1973. A member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Wilson received the nation's highest civilian award, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, in July 2003.

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