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MANHATTAN INSTITUTE BOOK CATALOG

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A Capitalism for the People: Recapturing the Lost Genius of American Prosperity
by Luigi Zingales
Basic Books, June 2012

Italian-born economist Luigi Zingales tries to rescue American capitalism from Berlusconi-style cronyism, as our financial industry rejects free markets and embraces big government.
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A Manifesto for Media Freedom
by Adam D. Thierer, Brian C. Anderson
Encounter Books, September 2008

Anderson and Thierer examine the serious threat that free political speech is facing in America today. The rise of alternative media destroyed the liberal monopoly over news outlets and created a diverse marketplace of ideas they dub the "media cornucopia." Many people are working to stifle this new universe of political discourse through media regulations and campaign-finance reform that purport to establish "fairness" but that in practice would lead to a much less diverse and open media universe.
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After The Fall: Saving Capitalism From Wall Street—and Washington
by Nicole Gelinas
Encounter Books, October 2009

In After the Fall, Gelinas shows how the financial crisis that began in 2008 was not a failure of markets, but a failure of government to understand its proper role in markets. Her brilliant reading of financial history and of current events reveals that the problems were predictable, and the solutions straightforward.
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All About the Beat: Why Hip Hop Can't Save Black America
by John H. McWhorter
Gotham Books, June 2008

In this measured, impassioned work, McWhorter delves into the rhythms of hip-hop, celebrating its artistry. But at the same time he points out that hip-hop is simply music, and takes issue with those who celebrate hip-hop as the beginning of a new civil rights revolution. In a power vacuum, this often offensive and destructive music has become a leading voice of black America, and McWhorter stridently calls for a renewed sense of purpose and pride in black communities. Joining the ranks of Russell Simmons and others who have called for a deeper investigation of hip-hop's role in black culture, McWhorter's All About the Beat is a spectacular polemic that takes the debate in a seismically new direction.
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America in Black and White: One Nation, Indivisible
by Stephan Thernstrom, Abigail Thernstrom
Simon & Schuster, September 1997

A monumental study of race in America over the last fifty years. This book highlights unheralded truths about the socioeconomic, educational, and cultural condition of African-Americans.
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America's Trillion-Dollar Housing Mistake: The Failure of American Housing Policy
by Howard Husock
Ivan R. Dee, 2003

For more than seven decades, American government has acted to provide housing for the poor. In America's Trillion-Dollar Housing Mistake, Howard Husock explains how, as with so many anti-poverty efforts, low-income housing programs have harmed those they were meant to help while causing grave collateral damage to cities and their citizens.
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Are Cops Racist? How the War Against the Police Harms Black Americans
by Heather Mac Donald
Ivan R. Dee, January 2003

Heather Mac Donald answers this question with a resounding, convincing "No." The portrayal of police officers as brutal and racist is not only wrong, it also undermines cops' effectiveness—thereby hurting, not helping, black Americans.
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Assimilation, American Style
by Peter D. Salins
Basic Books, 1996

A brilliant examination of the American melting pot. In this work, Salins argues that the integration of immigrants and ethnic groups into mainstream American society has formed the foundation of this nation's success and that the goal of cultural assimilation remains vital to the American future.
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Authentically Black: Essays for the Black Silent Majority
by John H. McWhorter
Gotham Books, January 2003

Addressing subjects as diverse as affirmative action, blacks on television, and the reparations movement, John McWhorter identifies and assesses black America's tendency to publicly emphasize a victimhood it privately acknowledges to be a thing of the past.
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Beyond the Color Line: New Perspectives on Race and Ethnicity
by Stephan Thernstrom, Abigail Thernstrom
Hoover Institution Press, January 2002

A collection of 25 essays by some of America’s leading thinkers. Addressing such issues as racial preferences, education, and crime, these essays maintain that old civil-rights strategies cannot solve today’s problems.
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Breaking Free: Public School Lessons and the Imperative of School Choice
by Sol Stern
Encounter Books, May 2003

Breaking Free explores the growing demand for school choice among poor families in the inner city. Stern describes the dramatic successes and occasional failures of this new civil rights movement in three key cities: Milwaukee, Cleveland, and New York.
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By Their Bootstraps: The Lives of Twelve Gilded Age Social Entrepreneurs
by Martin Morse Wooster
Manhattan Institute, 2002

Social entrepreneurs, individuals who employ private-sector talents to meet pressing public problems, are an increasingly important part of the American landscape. This collection of short biographic sketches is offered as a reminder of the principles of original social entrepreneurs in America and their tremendous potential for transforming today’s society.
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Coloring the News: How Crusading for Diversity Has Corrupted American Journalism
by William McGowan
Encounter Books, November 2001

William McGowan brilliantly shows how journalism’s well-intentioned quest for racial and ethnic diversity has led to skewed reporting, political correctness, and ideological monopoly in the press.
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Consumer-Driven Health Care: Implications for Providers, Payers, and Policy-Makers
by Regina E. Herzlinger
Jossey-Bass, April 2004

Consumer-Driven Health Care discusses how increased consumer control of health care is shaking up the medical and insurance systems. Herzlinger states that hospitals, doctors, benefits administrators, accountants, government policymakers, and insurers had better adapt or else they will be replaced.
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Democracy by Decree: What Happens When Courts Run Government
by David Schoenbrod, Ross Sandler
Yale University Press, January 2003

A penetrating account of the damaging effects of institutional reform litigation—lawsuits that aim to improve government by implementing wide-ranging reforms, but wind up transferring power from elected, accountable officials to lawyers.
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Democratic Capitalism and Its Discontents
by Brian C. Anderson
ISI Books, June 2007

In Democratic Capitalism and Its Discontents, City Journal editor Brian Anderson takes a hard look at the challenges facing democratic capitalism in a society searching for equality at all costs.
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Development Without Aid
by Melvyn Krauss
McGraw-Hill, 1982


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Economics Does Not Lie: A Defense of the Free Market in a Time of Crisis
by Guy Sorman
Encounter Books, July 2009

In Economics Does Not Lie, Guy Sorman defends capitalism from its new enemies. He argues that it is important to remember the unprecedented benefits free markets have brought mankind, and explains that the current crisis can be corrected with the tools of economic science—as long as the forces of ignorance or demagoguery don't prevail. Based on extensive interviews with the world's leading economists, and written with verve and clarity, Sorman's book makes a unique and timely contribution to understanding our time.
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Education Myths: What Special-Interest Groups Want You to Believe About our Schools—and Why It Isn't So
by Jay P. Greene
Rowan & Littlefield, September 2005

Using his research and other published scholarship, Jay P. Greene provides evidence and arguments which debunk 18 commonly held myths about education. These myths, Dr. Greene argues, have distorted virtually every area of education policy and disentangling them is imperative to changing the system for the better.
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Fixing Broken Windows: Restoring Order and Reducing Crime in Our Communities
by George L. Kelling, Catherine M. Coles
The Free Press, November 1996

Newly released in paperback, this work outlines the policing strategies that have led to dramatic reductions in crime rates in New York and other major cities.
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Free Banking and Monetary Reform
by David Glasner
Cambridge University Press, August 1989

This book boldly challenges the conventional view that the state must play a dominant role in the monetary system.
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From Adam Smith to the Wealth of America
by Alvin Rabushka
Transaction Books, June 1985


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Galileo's Revenge: Junk Science in the Courtroom
by Peter W. Huber
Perseus Book Group, August 1991

A seminal work on the emerging class of lawyers and expert witnesses who push forward unsubstantiated legal claims on the basis of "junk science." In Galileo's Revenge, Huber offers a scathing indictment of how legal professionals have shifted the law away from serious science.
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Government 2.0: Using Technology to Improve Education, Cut Red Tape, Reduce Gridlock, and Enhance Democracy
by William D. Eggers
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, January 2005

William Eggers explores how technology has revolutionized the dialogue between governments and their constituents. He provides detailed accounts of successful technology strategies and provides practical suggestions for using technology to provide government services, while addressing privacy and data safety concerns. This book is essential reading for policy makers, technology practitioners and cyber-savvy citizens.
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Hard Green: Saving the Environment from the Environmentalists
by Peter W. Huber
Basic Books, January 2000

MI Senior Fellow Peter Huber, author of—among other books—Liability, Galileo's Revenge, and Judging Science, brings his profound understanding of science and public policy to bear in Hard Green. He offers a new vision for market-friendly environmentalism that evokes Theodore Roosevelt's conservationism.
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Health, Lifestyle and Environment: Countering the Panic
by The Social Affairs Unit, Manhattan Institute
Manhattan Institute, 1991

This book is not available on the Manhattan Institute website. For further info please e-mail Dolores Garrigo, dgarrigo@manhattan-institute.org.
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How NATO Weakens the West
by Melvyn Krauss
Simon & Schuster, October 1986

Krauss calls the North Atlantic Treaty Orgnaization a "lopsided partnership" and believes that continued European dependence on American protection and weapons is "absurd." The main thrust of his argument is that the removal of U.S. troops and subsidies would increase, not decrease, European, Japanese and South Korean efforts in their own defense (and save the U.S. billions of dollars).
AVAILABLE AT AMAZON


How We Got Here: The 70s: The Decade that Brought You Modern Life—for Better or Worse
by David Frum
Basic Books, January 2000

Senior Fellow David Frum, author of Dead Right, has written a political and cultural history of America since the Seventies.
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In Pursuit: Of Happiness and Good Government
by Charles Murray
Simon & Schuster, October 1988

Charles Murray’s fascinating thesis—that analysts, as they evaluate public policy, mistakenly fail to consider how it affects people’s happiness—leads him on a far-ranging, thought-provoking exploration of what constitutes happiness, how analysts can begin to take it into consideration, and how policy can regard it as a goal worth achieving.
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Judging Science: Scientific Knowledge and the Federal Courts
by Peter W. Huber, Kenneth R. Foster
MIT Press, May 1997

A probing account of the nature of science and its use and abuse in the judicial system.
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Law and Disorder in Cyberspace: Abolish the FCC and Let Common Law Rule the Telecosm
by Peter W. Huber
Oxford University Press, 1997

Peter Huber's latest work is a meticulous history of telecommunications regulation and a call for opening the telecosm to unfettered competition.
AVAILABLE AT AMAZON


Lawyer Barons: What Their Contingency Fees Really Cost America
by Lester Brickman
Cambridge University Press, 2011

Lawyer Barons is a broad and deep inquiry into how contingency fees distort our civil justice system, influence our political system and endanger democratic governance. Contrary to a broad academic consensus, Lawyer Barons argues that the financial incentives for lawyers to litigate are so inordinately high that they perversely impact our civil justice system and impose other unconscionable costs.
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Leaving Women Behind: Modern Families, Outdated Laws
by Kimberley A. Strassel, John C. Goodman, Celeste Colgan
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Spring 2006

Leaving Women Behind demonstrates how outdated institutions penalize single mothers, working wives, and widows. The authors identify needed changes to bring antiquated public policies into the twenty-first century. They offer realistic solutions that empower people, giving them more choices and more control over their lives.
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Liability: The Legal Revolution and Its Consequences
by Peter W. Huber
Basic Books, 1988

One of the first works to explain the recent transformation of American liability law and the litigation explosion it unleashed. In this book, Huber shows how the dramatic increase in liability lawsuits has undermined the very principles that brought it about in the first place — safety and freedom.
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Liberation's Children: Parents and Kids in a Postmodern Age
by Kay S. Hymowitz
Ivan R. Dee, 2003

In Liberation's Children, Hymowitz chronicles the moral decline of modern America's privileged youth. Hymowitz argues that although our society produces overachievers dedicated to the gospel of "ecstatic capitalism," it leaves them without a sense of fulfillment.
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Life at the Bottom: The Worldview That Makes the Underclass
by Theodore Dalrymple
Ivan R. Dee, November 2001

Prison doctor and gifted essayist Theodore Dalrymple eloquently discusses the self-destructive worldview of the British underclass—a worldview created not by that underclass, however, but by an egotistical intelligentsia.
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Losing Ground: American Social Policy 1950-1980
by Charles Murray
Basic Books, September 1984

The book that has indelibly shaped the debate over welfare in America. In this ground-breaking work, Murray argues that the massive social programs of the 1960's have not only failed to improve conditions for poor Americans, but have perpetuated and intensified the disadvantages that the Great Society set out to eradicate.
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Manning Up: How the Rise of Women Has Turned Men into Boys
by Kay S. Hymowitz
Basic Books, March 2011

The traditional roles of "family man" and "provider" have been turned upside down as "pre-adult" men, stuck between adolescence and "real" adulthood, find themselves lost in a world where women make more money, are more educated, and are less likely to want to settle down and build a family. Thoroughly researched and bursting with radical implications for both present and future generations, Manning Up is the essential book for understanding the dramatic changes that are taking place in the lives of young people across the globe.
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Markets and Minorities
by Thomas Sowell
Basic Books, September 1981

One of the classic works on the economic and social problems confronting minorities. In this volume, Sowell shatters myths about the impact of discrimination in the lives of minorities, and shows that the market can significantly improve the economic condition of American minorities.
AVAILABLE AT AMAZON


Marriage and Caste in America: Separate and Unequal Families in a Post-Marital Age
by Kay S. Hymowitz
Ivan R. Dee, November 2006

Many scholars have explored the resulting breakdown of marriage over the past forty years and the exponential increase of divorce and out of wedlock birth rates. But Hymowitz adds something new: she shows how this marital breakdown is intricately connected to our high rates of poverty and inequality and threatens to turn the nation into "two Americas," one marriage-minded, child-centered, educationally successful, and affluent, the other marriage-indifferent, barely educated, and all too often financially precarious.
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Miracle in East Harlem: The Fight for Choice in Public Education
by Seymour Fliegel
Random House, August 1993

The inspirational account of how a unique school-choice program helped turn around the lives of some of New York City's most disadvantaged youths. In Miracle in East Harlem, Fliegel, who developed District Four's school-choice program, documents how educational innovation can overcome the greatest challenges confronting urban education, from poverty to bureaucracy.
AVAILABLE AT AMAZON


Modern Sex: Liberation and Its Discontents
by Myron Magnet
Ivan R. Dee, November 2001

A collection of essays culled from the pages of City Journal by its editor, Myron Magnet. Modern Sex demonstrates that the sexual revolution "has failed in its own terms," as Magnet writes, "to make us all happier, freer, more fulfilled, more alive."
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New Directions in Liability Law
by Walter Olson
Academy of Political Science, 1988


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New York Unbound: The City and the Politics of the Future
by Peter D. Salins
Basil Blackwell, November 1988

A broad-ranging series of prescriptions for improving New York, in such areas as education, public housing and welfare, by replacing failed big-government policies with market-driven strategies.
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No Excuses: Closing the Racial Gap in Learning
by Stephan Thernstrom, Abigail Thernstrom
Simon & Schuster, 2003

Two distinguished experts on race in America offer a sober appraisal of the racial gap in education—and show how it can be overcome. No Excuses highlights inner-city schools across the country that are models of superb education and thus beacons of hope.
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Not with a Bang But a Whimper: The Politics and Culture of Decline
by Theodore Dalrymple
Ivan R. Dee Publisher, October 2008

In Not with a Bang But a Whimper, Dalrymple takes the measure of our cultural decline, with special attention to Britain-its bureaucratic muddle, oppressive welfare mentality, and aimless youth-all pursued in the name of democracy and freedom. He shows how terrorism and the growing numbers of Muslim minorities have changed our public life.
AVAILABLE AT AMAZON


One Nation, One Standard: An Ex-Liberal on How Hispanics Can Succeed Just Like Other Immigrant Groups
by Herman Badillo
Sentinel, January 2007

"As the nation's first Puerto Rican-born U.S. congressman, the trailblazing Badillo supported bilingual education and other government programs he thought would help the Hispanic community. But Badillo came to see that the real path to prosperity, political unity, and the American mainstream is self-reliance, not big government. Badillo's solution to this problem relies on traditional values: hard work, education, and achievement. His lessons are important not only for Hispanics but for every American."
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Orwell's Revenge: The 1984 Palimpsest
by Peter W. Huber
The Free Press, 1994

A fascinating experiment in fiction, political analysis and technology, Orwell’s Revenge is 1984 rewritten. Peter Huber (and his computer) boldly perpetrate “the quintessentially Orwellian crime—a crime of plagiarism, forgery, artistic vandalism, and historic revisionism.”
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Our Culture, What's Left of It: The Mandarins and the Masses
by Theodore Dalrymple
Ivan R. Dee, May 2005

In Our Culture, What's Left of It, Theodore Dalrymple explores the relationship between society and culture, examining how seemingly insignificant ideas in one realm may shape the hard realities in the other.
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Out of the Barrio: Toward a New Politics of Hispanic Assimilation
by Linda Chavez
Basic Books, October 1991

The untold story of Hispanic progress in America. Hispanics, Chavez argues, are following the path blazed by earlier immigrants and entering the American mainstream–a trajectory threatened not by poverty or racism, but by misguided programs like affirmative action and bilingual education which actively hinder Hispanic assimilation into American society.
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Pathology of the Elites: How the Arrogant Classes Plan to Run Your Life
by Michael Knox Beran
Roman and Littlefield, November 2010

In this bracing collection of provocative essays, Michael Knox Beran examines the false benevolence that characterizes the power classes in contemporary America. Through readings of such thinkers as Hannah Arendt, Isaiah Berlin, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Abraham Lincoln, Mr. Beran exposes the romance of dominion that underlies the philosophy of social benevolence.
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Phantom Risk: Scientific Inference and the Law
by Peter W. Huber, Kenneth R. Foster, David E. Bernstein
MIT Press, June 1993

A fascinating collection of in-depth case studies examining how unsettled scientific disputes have aroused public fears and led to legal mayhem. Phantom Risk brings together distinguished scientific experts to describe today's most complicated scientific controversies and their legal results.
AVAILABLE AT AMAZON


Power and Privilege: Labor Unions in America
by Morgan O. Reynolds
Universe, March 1984


AVAILABLE AT AMAZON


Power Hungry: The Myths of "Green" Energy and the Real Fuels of the Future
by Robert Bryce
PublicAffairs, April 2010

Robert Bryce offers a clear, concise assessment of the $5 trillion-per-year global energy industry and the fuels, both hydrocarbons and alternatives, that power the world economy.
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Privatization: The Key to Better Government
by E. S. Savas
Chatham House, November 1987


AVAILABLE AT AMAZON


Privatizing the Public Sector
by E. S. Savas
Chatham House, 1982


AVAILABLE AT AMAZON


Ready or Not: Why Treating Children as Small Adults Endangers Their Future—and Ours
by Kay S. Hymowitz
The Free Press, October 1999

Kay Hymowitz, MI Senior Fellow and City Journal Contributing Editor, examines the impoverished concept of childhood that now dominates American popular culture.
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Regulating to Disaster: How Green Jobs Policies Are Damaging America's Economy
by Diana Furchtgott-Roth
Encounter, September 2012

Barely definable and rarely profitable, "green jobs" saddle taxpayers with enormous costs and jeopardize real jobs in market-driven industries, Diana Furchtgott Roth reveals.
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Regulation by Prosecution
by Roberta Karmel
Simon & Schuster, March 1982


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Reinventing the Melting Pot: The New Immigrants and What It Means to Be American
by Tamar Jacoby
Basic Books, 2004

Jacoby includes distinguished social scientists, prize-winning journalists and fiction-writers—thinkers like Nathan Glazer, Herbert Gans, John McWhorter, Michael Barone, Pete Hamill and Stanley Crouch in her look at the melting pot in America, and what it means to be an American in the age of globalization.
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Romancing Opiates: Pharmacological Lies and the Addiction Bureaucracy
by Theodore Dalrymple
Encounter Books, April 2006

Theodore Dalrymple believes that almost everything people know about opiate addiction is wrong. Using evidence from literature and pharmacology and drawing on examples from his own clinical experience, Dalrymple shows that addiction is not a disease, but a response to personal and existential problems. He argues that withdrawal from opiates is not a serious medical condition but a relatively trivial experience, and says that criminality causes addiction far more often than addiction causes criminality.
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Scarcity by Design: The Legacy of New York's Housing Policies
by Peter D. Salins, Gerard Mildner
Harvard University Press, December 1992

Addressing issues that are hotly debated in the Big Apple and other cities across the nation, Peter Salins and Gerard Mildner analyze New York's policies and assess their largely detrimental effects on housing quality and availability. They show how programs that were instituted for the benefit of both investors and the poor - by directly and indirectly subsidizing housing construction and by capping rents - have instead caused misallocation of housing, exacerbated tensions between tenants and landlords, progressively stifled private investment, and resulted in building deterioration and abandonment.
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Second Thoughts: Myths and Morals of U.S. Economic History
by Donald N. McCloskey
Oxford University Press, March 1993

This book examines the past as a way of preparing for the future. McCloskey has brought together leading economic historians who show that commonly accepted perceptions of our economic past can be wrong and, therefore, misleading.
AVAILABLE AT AMAZON


Secrets of the Tax Revolt
by James Ring Adams
Harcourt Brace Jovanovitch, July 1984


AVAILABLE AT AMAZON


Shakedown: The Continuing Conspiracy Against The American Taxpayer
by Steven Malanga
Ivan R. Dee, October 2010

As Americans anxiously ponder the economic future, public-employees' unions and government-financed community-activists are relentlessly focused on increasing the size of government. In Shakedown, Mr. Malanga details this "conspiracy against taxpayers" and warns that the bill is now coming due for the rise of this new political powerhouse.
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Someone Else's House: America's Unfinished Struggle for Integration
by Tamar Jacoby
The Free Press, June 1998

A thoroughly researched history of race relations in three American cities since the civil-rights era. This book captures the heartbreaking collapse of the early ideals of integration and color-blindness.
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South Park Conservatives: The Revolt Against Liberal Media Bias
by Brian C. Anderson
Regnery Publishing, Inc., April 2005

Take a behind-the-scenes look at how conservatives—and even iconoclasts who don't consider themselves conservative—are overthrowing political correctness and the liberal media. From the bloggers who demolished Dan Rather to the Swift Boat veterans who sank John Kerry to the gleeful anti-political correctness of such comedic send-ups as South Park and Team America, the American media Landscape has suffered an earthquake. Brian Anderson illustrates how "South Park Conservatives" are changing everything.
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Teachers Matter: Rethinking How Public Schools Identify, Reward, and Retain Great Educators
by Marcus A. Winters
Rowman & Littlefield, January 2012

In Teachers Matter, Marcus A. Winters, argues that our failure to identify and reward high-quality teachers has been devastating for public school students. The question is, how do we sort out the good teachers from the bad? Winters shows the shortcomings of the current system, which relies on credentials and longevity, and spells out a series of reforms based on results achieved in the classroom.
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The Beholden State: California’s Lost Promise and How to Recapture It
by Brian C. Anderson
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, June 2013


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The Bottomless Well: The Twilight of Fuel, The Virtue of Waste and Why We Will Never Run Out Of Energy
by Mark P. Mills, Peter W. Huber
Basic Books, 2005

The sheer volume of talk about energy, energy prices, and energy policy on both sides of the political aisle suggests that we must know something about these subjects. But according to Peter Huber and Mark Mills, the things we "know" are mostly myths. They explain why demand will never go down, why most of what we think of as "energy waste" actually benefits us; why more efficient cars, engines, and bulbs will never lower demand, and why energy supply is infinite.
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The Burden of Bad Ideas
by Heather Mac Donald
Ivan R. Dee, October 2000

A wide-ranging, scathing attack on elite opinion, particularly as it deals with issues involving race and poverty. The intellectual orthodoxy that insists on viewing the poor as oppressed victims, Mac Donald shows, is far more oppressive than anything it seeks to condemn.
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The Cure in the Code: How 20th Century Law Is Undermining 21st Century Medicine
by Peter W. Huber
Basic Books, November 2013


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The Cure: How Capitalism Can Save American Health Care
by David Gratzer
Encounter Books, October 2006

While American medicine has never been better, angst over American health care has never been greater. In this path-breaking book—Nobel laureate Milton Friedman calls it "fascinating and thorough"—Dr. David Gratzer goes to the heart of the problem, showing that the crisis in American health care stems largely from its addiction to outmoded and discredited economic ideas.
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The Dream and the Nightmare: The Sixties' Legacy to the Underclass
by Myron Magnet
William Morrow, March 1993

Cited by George W. Bush as the second-most-important book he had ever read—right after the Bible. The Dream and the Nightmare argues that today's underclass owes its existence to the cultural revolution of the Sixties, a revolution that was effected by the prosperous but suffered by the poor.
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The Ecology of Housing Destruction
by Peter D. Salins
NYU Press, February 1980


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The Economy in Mind
by Warren Brookes
Universe, 1982


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The Empire of Lies: The Truth about China in the Twenty-First Century
by Guy Sorman
Encounter Books, April 2008

The Western Press these days is full of stories on China's arrival as a superpower, some even warning that the future may belong to her. But as Guy Sorman reveals in The Empire of Lies, China's success is, at least in part, a mirage.
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The Entrepreneurial City: A How-To Handbook for Urban Innovators
by The Center for Civic Innovation
The Manhattan Institute, 1999

Newly-elected mayors and others interested in urban policy need look no further than The Entrepreneurial City to learn what America’s new breed of innovative mayors have done in recent years to improve the quality of life in their cities. The Entrepreneurial City includes essays from some of these “supermayors” and other urban policy experts on seven topics: Managing City Finances, Improving Education, Reducing Crime, Cutting Regulation, Increasing Economic Development, Welfare, and Civil Society.
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The Excuse Factory: How Employment Law Is Paralyzing the American Workplace
by Walter Olson
The Free Press, June 1997

Walter Olson documents how a web of regulations, laws, and court decisions has fouled and restricted employers' and employees' relationships and freedoms.
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The Governing of Agriculture
by Bruce Gardner
Regents Press of Kansas, December 1981


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The Growth Experiment: How the New Tax Policy Is Transforming the U.S. Economy
by Lawrence B. Lindsey
Basic Books, April 1990

One of the most respected defenses of supply-side tax policy to date. Lindsey, a former Governor of the Federal Reserve, outlines the case for tax cuts and sets forth a plan for improving our current tax system.
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The Immigration Solution: A Better Plan Than Today's
by Steven Malanga, Heather Mac Donald, Victor Davis Hanson
Ivan R.Dee, November 2007

Each author explores an important aspect of the immigration debate, including the social, economic, and political results of current immigration policies. Together, the authors argue for an immigration policy similar to those of other advanced nations: one that admits skilled and educated people based on what they can do for the country, not what the country can do for them.
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The Litigation Explosion: What Happened When America Unleashed the Lawsuit
by Walter Olson
Penguin Books, 1991

Called the best book ever written on the subject of lawsuits in the United States. Both serious and entertaining, Olson's Litigation Explosion documents how America has become the most litigious society in the world.
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The Millennial City: A New Urban Paradigm for 21st-Century America
by Myron Magnet
Ivan R. Dee, May 2000

The recent renaissance of America's cities is no accident. Rather, it is due to a coherent set of policies and principles, spelled out in these City Journal essays, that light the way toward urban prosperity and growth.
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The New New Left: How American Politics Works Today Tax Eaters vs. Taxpayers
by Steven Malanga
Ivan R. Dee, May 2005

A provocative and eye-opening analysis of a new dynamic that is reshaping American politics: a face-off between tax eaters and taxpayers.
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The New Protectionism: The Welfare State and International Trade
by Melvyn Krauss
NYU Press, June 1978


AVAILABLE AT AMAZON


The Rise and Fall of New York City
by Roger Starr
Basic Books, April 1985


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The Rule of Lawyers: How the New Litigation Elite Threatens America's Rule of Law
by Walter Olson
Truman Talley Books/St. Martin's, January 2003

A gripping exploration of the growing power of massive class-action lawsuits. Olson shows how trial lawyers are rapidly becoming an unelected, unchecked and unbalanced fourth branch of government.
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The Seamless City: A Conservative Mayor's Approach To Urban Revitalization That Can Work Anywhere
by Rick Baker
Regnery Publishing Inc., April 2011

During his two terms in office, Republican Rick Baker worked toward a clear, uncompromising goal: to make St. Petersburg, Florida, the best city in America. He led a downtown renaissance, rebuilt the most economically depressed area of the city, attracted businesses, worked to reduce violent crime, and made public schools a city priority—all with the conservative principles and measurable results contained in this one-of-a-kind book.
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The State Against Blacks
by Walter Williams
McGraw-Hill, October 1982

A critical look at race in America. Williams argues that while bigotry and discrimination may be a partial explanation for the condition of many blacks in America, they are not the only, or the most important, reasons why many blacks are behind. Instead, he shows, a myriad of local, state, and federal laws systematically impede economic and social progress for minorities in America.
AVAILABLE AT AMAZON


The Supply-Side Solution
by Timothy Roth, Bruce Bartlett
Chatham House, October 1983


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The Twenty-First Century City: Resurrecting Urban America
by Stephen Goldsmith
Regnery Publishing, December 1997

The fascinating first-hand account of an innovative mayor's introduction of market-based governance in big-city America.
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The Twilight of Sovereignty: How the Information Revolution is Transforming Our World
by Walter B. Wriston
Charles Scribner's Sons, October 1992

An explanation of how the revolution in information technology has fundamentally changed our daily lives and altered our conceptions of the nation-state. Wriston, the former chairman of Citicorp, argues that in this global information age, a new democratic order is dramatically transforming our public and private institutions in ways unfathomable just a few years ago.
AVAILABLE AT AMAZON


The U.S. Balance of Payments and the Sinking Dollar
by Wilson Schmidt
NYU Press, 1979


AVAILABLE AT AMAZON


Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier
by Edward Glaeser
The Penguin Press, February 2011

Using intrepid reportage, myth-shattering analysis, and eloquent argument, Edward Glaeser makes an impassioned case for the city's import and splendor. He reminds us forcefully why we should love our cities and how to give them their due or else suffer consequences that will hurt us all, no matter where we live.
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Uncontrolled: The Surprise Pay-Off Of Trial And Error In Business, Public Policy, and Society
by Jim Manzi
Basic Books, April 2012

Software entrepreneur Jim Manzi applies the rigor of randomized scientific experimentation to policy, and proves most government programs—expensive and intrusive—don't work.
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Wealth and Poverty
by George Gilder
Basic Books, 1980

One of the most influential economic books published in the past quarter-century. Frequently cited as the intellectual basis for Ronald Reagan's economic policy, Wealth and Poverty reassesses Keynesian welfare economics and presents the basics of supply-side economic theory.
AVAILABLE AT AMAZON


What Makes Charity Work?
by Myron Magnet
Ivan R. Dee, October 2000

These clear-sighted essays from City Journal contrast successful traditional philanthropy, which emphasized values and personal responsibility, with failed newer philanthropy, which emphasizes government-sponsored social engineering.
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Who Killed Health Care? America's $2 Trillion Medical Problem—And the Consumer-Driven Cure
by Regina E. Herzlinger
McGraw-Hill, June 2007

Professor Herzlinger, often referred to as "the Godmother of Consumer-Driven Health Care" exposes the reality of our health care system; one that runs at the expense of those who most need it, patients, and those who most serve it, doctors. In Who Killed Health Care?, Herzlinger issues a call to arms to revolutionize our health care system with a consumer-driven cure.
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Why Obama's Government Takeover of Health-Care Will Be a Disaster
by David Gratzer
Encounter Books, November 2009

Dr. Gratzer shows why socialized medicine will make America sick and by examining the realities of existing health care in this country, he reveals how basic free market reforms can revive the private system we already have, without ruining the patient/doctor relationship, stifling scientific advances, and further devastating our economy.
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Winning the Race: Beyond the Crisis in Black America
by John H. McWhorter
Dutton and Gotham Books, February 2006

McWhorter traces the decline of the black inner city since the Civil Rights movement and rejects the usual assumptions about black history and culture. In Winning the Race, McWhorter offers a compelling new vision for the future of black America.
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