Your current web browser is outdated. For best viewing experience, please consider upgrading to the latest version.

Donation - Other Level

Please use the quantity box to donate any amount you wish. Sign Up to Donate

Contact

Send a question or comment using the form below. This message may be routed through support staff.

Email Article

Password Reset Request

Register


Add a topic or expert to your feed.

Following

Follow Experts & Topics

Stay on top of our work by selecting topics and experts of interest.

Experts
Topics
Project
On The Ground
ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed
ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed

Manhattan Institute

search
Close Nav

Trends In Assistance And Dependency: Tracking Programs for New York City's Poor, 1956-2014

report

Trends In Assistance And Dependency: Tracking Programs for New York City's Poor, 1956-2014

May 20, 2014
Urban PolicyWelfareOtherNYC

New York City's welfare caseload has declined dramatically since peaking, in the mid-1990s, just prior to the enactment of a major federal reform implemented locally under two mayors, Rudolph Giuliani and Michael Bloomberg. Although the city’s poverty rate rose during the 2007–09 recession, it remains 71 percent below its peak level (under the old welfare rules) of the mid-1990s.

Mayor Bill de Blasio has emphasized his desire to do more to help low-income New Yorkers. He also has signaled his willingness to loosen some restrictions on public assistance, which could affect caseload trends in the future.

During a time of transition for the city's antipoverty efforts, this report benchmarks key long-term measures of dependency and government aid to the poor, including: the number of individuals and families receiving cash assistance; enrollment in the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP, or “food stamps”); enrollment in the Medicaid health-insurance program for the poor; the extent of receipt of work-related tax credits; and overall changes in the poverty rate.

This report is meant as a prospective standard for future comparison.

READ FULL REPORT

Saved!
Close