Your current web browser is outdated. For best viewing experience, please consider upgrading to the latest version.

Donation - Other Level

Please use the quantity box to donate any amount you wish. Sign Up to Donate

Contact

Send a question or comment using the form below. This message may be routed through support staff.

Email Article

Password Reset Request

Register


Add a topic or expert to your feed.

Following

Follow Experts & Topics

Stay on top of our work by selecting topics and experts of interest.

Experts
Topics
Project
On The Ground
ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed
ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed

Manhattan Institute

search
Close Nav

Pushed Out? Low-Performing Students and New York City Charter Schools

report

Pushed Out? Low-Performing Students and New York City Charter Schools

March 12, 2015
EducationPre K-12

Executive Summary

The significant growth of charter schools in the United States has brought praise for the excellent results achieved by some schools as well as criticism that charter schools may not be serving the most disadvantaged students.

Critics of charter schools, in New York City and elsewhere, commonly assert that charters’ (often) strong academic performance derives primarily from the type of student educated, rather than the quality of schooling provided. In particular, many charter school opponents argue that charters systematically “push out” low-performing, or otherwise difficult-to-educate, students in order to boost aggregate test scores.

This paper uses longitudinal NYC student-level enrollment data to assess such claims. Key findings include:

  • Low-performing students are more mobile, regardless of where they are enrolled: in NYC charters as well as traditional public schools, low-performing students are more likely to change schools than their higher-performing peers.
  • Low-performing students are not more likely to exit NYC charters than traditional public schools.
  • To the extent that higher attrition rates for low-performing NYC students offer cause for concern, they are no less a problem for the city’s traditional public schools than they are for its charters.

READ FULL REPORT

Saved!
Close