Your current web browser is outdated. For best viewing experience, please consider upgrading to the latest version.

Donation - Other Level

Please use the quantity box to donate any amount you wish. Sign Up to Donate

Contact Heather Mac Donald

Send a question or comment using the form below. This message may be routed through support staff.

Email Article

Password Reset Request

Register


Add a topic or expert to your feed.

Following

Follow Experts & Topics

Stay on top of our work by selecting topics and experts of interest.

Experts
Topics
Project
On The Ground
ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed
ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed

Manhattan Institute

search
Close Nav
Share this report on Close

Grading New York: An Evaluation of New York City's Progress Reports Program

report

Grading New York: An Evaluation of New York City's Progress Reports Program

By Marcus A. Winters November 1, 2008
EducationPre K-12

In 2006-07, New York City, the largest school district in the United States, decided it would follow several other school systems in adopting a progress report program. Under its program, the city grades schools from A to F according to an accumulating point system based on the weighted average of measurements of school environment, students’ performance, and students’ academic progress.

The implementation of these progress reports has not been without controversy. While many argue that they inform parents about public school quality and encourage schools to improve, others contend that grades lower morale at low-performing schools. To date there has been too little empirical information about the program’s effectiveness to settle these questions.

This paper incorporates student-level data in a regression-discontinuity design to study the impact of a school’s receipt of a particular grade – A, B, C, D, or F — on student proficiency in math and English one year later.

The main findings of the paper are as follows:

  • Students in schools earning an F grade made overall improvements in math the following year, though these improvements occurred primarily among fifth-graders.
  • Students in F-graded schools did no better or worse in English than students in schools that were not graded F.

READ FULL REPORT

Saved!
Close