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Education Working Paper
No. 8  February 2005


Public High School Graduation and College-Readiness Rates: 1991–2002

References

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  • ———, and Greg Forster (2003). “Public High School Graduation and College-Readiness Rates in the United States.” Manhattan Institute, September.
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WHAT THE PRESS SAID

SUMMARY:
This study calculates high school graduation rates and the percentage of all students who left high school eligible to apply for college from 1991 to 2002. The study finds that during this period the graduation rate went from 72% to 71%, while the college readiness rate increased from 25% to 34%. The authors argue that the finding of flat high school graduation rates and increasing college readiness rates is likely the result of the increased standards and accountability programs over the last decade, which have required students to take more challenging courses required for admission to college without pushing those students to drop out of high school.

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

ABOUT EDUCATION WORKING PAPERS

INTRODUCTION

PREVIOUS RESEARCH

METHOD

Calculating Public High School Graduation Rates

Calculating Public High School College-Readiness Rates

RESULTS

High School Graduation Rates for the Class of 2002

College-Readiness Rates for the Class of 2002

Comparing College-Ready Graduates with Students Actually Entering College

High School Graduation and College-Readiness Rates over Time

CONCLUSION

ENDNOTES

REFERENCES

Table 1: High School Graduation Rates for the Class of 2002

Table 2: Ranking the States by High School Graduation Rate

Table 3: Ranking States by White High School Graduation Rate

Table 4: Ranking States by African-American High School Graduation Rates

Table 5: Ranking States by Hispanic High School Graduation Rates

Table 6: College Readiness Rates by Region and State

Table 7: College Readiness Population Compared to Number of Students Who Entered College For First Time

Table 8: Total High School Graduation Rates by State, 1991–2002

Table 9: White High School Graduation Rates by State, 1997–2002

Table 10: African-American High School Graduation Rates by State, 1997–2002

Table 11: Hispanic High School Graduation Rates by State, 1997–2002

Table 12: Total College Readiness Rates by Region and State, 1991–2002

Table 13: White College Readiness Rates by Region and State, 1997–2002

Table 14: African-American College Readiness Rates by Region and State, 1997–2002

Table 15: Hispanic College Readiness Rates by Region and State, 1997–2002

 


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