Your current web browser is outdated. For best viewing experience, please consider upgrading to the latest version.

Donation - Other Level

Please use the quantity box to donate any amount you wish. Sign Up to Donate

Contact Heather Mac Donald

Send a question or comment using the form below. This message may be routed through support staff.

Email Article

Password Reset Request

Register


Add a topic or expert to your feed.

Following

Follow Experts & Topics

Stay on top of our work by selecting topics and experts of interest.

Experts
Topics
Project
On The Ground
ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed
ERROR
Main Error Mesage Here
More detailed message would go here to provide context for the user and how to proceed

Manhattan Institute

search
Close Nav
Share this report on Close

The Effects of Rent Deregulation in Massachusetts

report

The Effects of Rent Deregulation in Massachusetts

By Henry O. Pollakowski June 1, 1997
Urban PolicyOtherInfrastructure & Transportation

With the New York State Legislature debating the merits of deregulating rents, it is useful to consider the Massachusetts example, since it represents the most recent case of a large metropolitan area ending long-term controls. In 1994 Massachusetts voters approved a ballot referendum ending rent controls in the three cities that had them: The measure went into effect in 1995, and by the beginning of 1997 deregulation of the rental housing stock in these three cities was complete.

Even though the the Massachusetts experience is very much in progress, results to date provide encouragement for reform in New York. The news comes in three parts: deregulation has affected the poor less than anticipated, housing construction and renovation have picked up, and property-tax revenues have increased.

Rent control in Massachusetts stemmed from the Rent Control Enabling Act of 1970, a state law that allowed towns to limit rent increases and regulate evictions. The measure was passed as a temporary bulwark against inflation and expired in 1976. However, some jurisdictions passed home-rule tenant protections of their own that extended beyond that time.

READ FULL REPORT

Saved!
Close