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CRRUCS Report
2001


A Better Kind of High: How Religious Commitment Reduces Drug Use Among Poor Urban Teens

Table 2. Percent Change in Marijuana Use Comparing Adolescents with Low, Medium, and High Levels of Religious Commitment from Neighborhoods of Low, Medium, and High Disorder

 

 

Religious Commitme nt

 

 

% Change

 

% Change

Disorder

Low

Medium

High

Lo to Med Religious Commit

Med. to Hi
Religious Commit

Lo v Hi
Religious Commit

Lo Disorder & Lo Religious Commit v. Hi Disorder & Hi Religious Commit

Low

2.363417

2.254058

2.144699

-4.62716

-4.85165

-9.25431

 

Medium

2.507753

2.341582

2.175411

-6.62629

-7.09653

-13.2526

 

High

2.652088

2.429106

2.206123

-8.40779

-9.17963

-16.8156

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-6.6553*

 

 

Disorder

 

 

% Change

 

 

Religious Commitme nt

Low

Medium

High

Lo v. Med

Med. v. Hi

Lo v. Hi

 

Low

2.363417

2.507753

2.652088

6.10709

5.755551

12.21414

 

Medium

2.254058

2.341582

2.429106

3.882952

3.737815

7.765905

 

High

2.144699

2.175411

2.206123

1.431996

1.411779

2.863992

 

* This percent reduction is computed from the coefficients in the Low/Low and the High/High Cells.

Table 3. Percent Change in Hard Drug Use Comparing Adolescents with Low, Medium, and High Levels of Religious Commitment from Neighborhoods of Low, Medium, and High Disorder

 

 

Religious Commitme nt

 

 

% Change

 

% Change

Disorder

Low

Medium

High

Lo to Med Religious Commit

Med. to Hi Religious Commit

Lo v Hi Religious Commit

Lo Disorder & Lo Religious Commit v. Hi Disorder & Hi Religious Commit

Low

1.08876

1.07741

1.06606

-1.04249

-1.05348

-2.08499

 

Medium

1.112134

1.089924

1.067715

-1.99703

-2.03772

-3.99406

 

High

1.135508

1.102439

1.069369

-2.91227

-2.99963

-5.82454

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-1.78102*

 

 

Disorder

 

 

% Change

 

 

Religious Commitme nt

Low

Medium

High

Lo v. Med

Med. v. Hi

Lo v. Hi

 

Low

1.08876

1.112134

1.135508

2.14681

2.101691

4.293621

 

Medium

1.07741

1.089924

1.102439

1.16151

1.148174

2.323021

 

High

1.06606

1.067715

1.069369

0.155229

0.154988

0.310457

 

*This percent reduction is computed from the coefficients in the Low/Low and the High/High Cells.

 

 


Center for Civic Innovation.

University of Penn.
UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA
Center for Research on Religion and Urban Civil Society
SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
John J. DiIulio, Jr., Founding Director

EMAIL THIS | PRINTER FRIENDLY

WHAT THE PRESS SAID:

Keeping the Faith The Wall Street Journal, August 2, 2000
Faith-based organizations: A promise still untested by Jane Eisner, The Philadelphia Inquirer, August 1, 2000
Uncle Shrub's Cabin Black Church Backers Sing Hosannahs by James Ridgeway, The Village Voice, August 1, 2000
To combat drug use among teens, religion is a proven, powerful tool by Byron R. Johnson The Philadelphia Inquirer, July 30, 2000

SUMMARY:
Dr. Byron Johnsonís important analysis demonstrates that religious commitment among inner city teens dramatically reduces their likelihood to take illegal drugs. In fact, he finds that religious low-income urban teenagers are much less likely to use drugs than non-religious youths living in middle class neighborhoods.

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Foreword

Report

Why Neighborhood Conditions Affect Teen Drug Use

Why Individual Religious Commitment Matters

Study Design

Key Study Variables

Analytic Strategy

Summary of Findings

Conclusion

Appendix A: Study Details

Appendix B: Variable Operationalization

Appendix C: Analytic Model

Appendix D: Table 1

Appendix D: Tables 2 & 3

Appendix E: Figures 1-2

Endnotes

About CRRUCS

 


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