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WHO KILLED HEALTH CARE?
AMERICA'S $2 TRILLION MEDICAL PROBLEM AND THE CONSUMER-DRIVEN CURE


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Book Info:

Available at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Borders, and everywhere books
are sold!

ISBN: 0071487808
Hardcover


 


 

 

 

 


(McGraw-Hill, 2007)

By Regina Herzlinger

ARTICLES

Universal health insurance that's not under government control by Regina Herzlinger, Washington Examiner, July 27, 2007

How shameful that more than 40 million people in this great country—the wealthiest in the world—lack health insurance. The uninsured not only suffer from poorer health, but are all too often mistreated when they do seek hospital care: either charged bankrupting prices or tossed out. Does it make economic sense to provide coverage for tens of millions of uninsured? Critics say that we need at least $50 billion to subsidize those who cannot afford health insurance, and that universal health care will lead to a socialist, government-run health care system. But these criticisms misunderstand both the economics and administration of universal health care. Yes, it must be funded by taxes, which we pay primarily to help the less fortunate. But as Switzerland demonstrates, universal health care can be managed by private health insurers and providers...

Individual Freedom vs. Government Control by Tom Coburn & Regina Herzlinger, National Review Online, 8-1-07

Who Killed U.S. Medicine? by Regina E. Herzlinger, The Washington Post, July 29, 2007 (This piece has also be reprinted in The Sacramento Bee, 07-26-07, The Allentown Morning Call, 07-26-07, The China Post, 07-28-07, The Argus, 07-29-07, The Deseret Morning News, 07-29-07, The Oakland Tribune, 07-29-07, The Alameda Times Star, 07-29-07, and The Center Daily Times, 07-29-07).

America's physicians are the most trusted and valuable resources in our health-care system. Yet doctors' professionalism and incomes have taken a terrible beating recently. The American Medical Association, which received $286 million in revenue last year to protect the profession, has served physicians poorly. Physician incomes, when adjusted for inflation, declined 7 percent from 1995 to 2003, while those of professional and technical workers rose. But unlike other professionals—lawyers, architects, authors and economists—doctors' work is dictated by the policies of insurers and governments...

Where Are the Innovators in Health Care? by Regina E. Herzlinger, Wall Street Journal, July 19, 2007

No sector of our economy is more in need of innovation than health care, yet its many regulations handcuff entrepreneurs. A consumer-driven health-care system will unlock these shackles to bring about a much-needed entrepreneurial revolution... In almost every sector of our economy, brilliant, effective innovators have forced sluggish U.S. industries to become more productive. Sam Walton's exquisitely detailed supply chain management, coupled with his daring decision to locate Wal-Marts in rural areas, kick-started the boom in retailing, while Bill Gates, Steve Jobs and Michael Dell drove productivity in the IT sector. These entrepreneurs, and so many others, have fundamentally improved our economy... But can you name any innovators in our bloated, inefficient health-care system?...

 


 

Read an excerpt
“A wonderful Orwellian romp through issues which carry a deadly irony. . . Rarely has the case for the public been made with so much force, foresight, and wit, and a better way forward shown so clearly

James F. Fries, MD Professor of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine


BOOKS BY
Regina Herzlinger

Consumer-Driven Health Care: Implications for Providers, Payers, and Policy-Makers
(Jossey-Bass 2004)

Market-Driven
Health Care

(Perseus Book
Group 1997)

 

 

Manhattan Institute